5 Video Calling Tips From Google

5 Video Calling Tips From Google

TRY TO KEEP TIME TO CATCHUP WITH COLLEAGUES

In-office, meetings usually start with some informal small discussion. We share personal tidbits that work as an ice-breaker or communication check. If you are doing the same thing on remote calls also, it will not waste your time, it will improve the performance of the team. Science shows that teams who periodically share personal information perform better than teams who don’t. And when leaders model this, it can boost team performance even more.

So try to schedule catchups with your team for informal discussion over virtual coffee and lunch breaks.

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TRY TO DO EYE CONTACT DURING CALL

If you’re face-to-face with someone, you might notice they’ve leaned forward and invite them to jump into the conversation. Or, you might pick up on a sidelong glance in the audience while you’re giving a presentation, and pause to address a colleague’s confusion or skepticism. Research shows that on video calls where social cues are harder to see, we take 25 percent fewer speaking turns.

But video calls have something email doesn’t: eye contact. We feel more comfortable talking when our listeners’ eyes are visible because we can read their emotions and attitudes. This is especially important when we need more certainty—like when we meet a new team member or listen to a complex idea.

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TRY TO PROVIDE LITTLE VERBAL FEEDBACK FOR DISCUSSIONS

As a human, we're built for the fast in-person conversation. If the sound from someone's mouth doesn't reach you until a half-second later, you notice. A delay of 500 ms also whether from laggy audio or fumbling for the unmute button is more than in-person discussion time. These delays mess with the fundamental turn-taking mechanics of our conversations.

So on your next video conference, if it's a smaller group, try staying unmuted to provide little bits of verbal feedback like "Yeah", "Okay",'Hmm" to show you are active and listening.

 

ENCOURAGE MORE BALANCED CONVERSATION

Discussions on calls are less unique, and the famous "talking stick" gets passed less regularly. That is a serious deal for remote groups since sharing the floor all the more similar is a noteworthy factor in what makes one gathering more brilliant than another. Computational social researchers like Alex 'Sandy' Pentland and Anita Woolley have indicated that higher-performing bunches aren't comprised of people with higher IQs yet rather individuals who are increasingly touchy to feelings and offer the floor all the more similarly.

Distinguish calls where conversational elements could be better. Energize increasingly adjusted discussion, assist some with getting their voice heard, and remind others to pass the talking stick.

 
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MUST HAVE OPEN CONVERSATION WITH YOUR TEAMMATES

At the point when things turn out badly, remote groups are bound to accuse people as opposed to analyzing the circumstance, which harms attachment and execution. Various methods for working can be baffling, yet they're significant. Organic Anthropologist Helen Fisher has demonstrated that we can bridle the "profitable contact" of different work styles today like how tracker gatherers completed 50,000 years back to decide whether a newfound plant was noxious, therapeutic, or scrumptious.

Have an open discussion with your remote colleagues about your favored working styles and how you may supplement one another.